In the Media

Jabbar Collins And Danny Colon

In 2010, after four years of court battles, Mr. Rudin succeeded in exonerating Jabbar Collins, a noted jailhouse "lawyer" who had served more than 16 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. The subsequent federal court fight that led to Jabbar's exoneration was covered prominently in The Times and the New York Law Journal. Jabbar's remarkable road from prisoner to legal assistant at Mr. Rudin's law office was featured on the front page of The Wall Street Journal. The civil rights lawsuit that Rudin brought on Mr. Collins' behalf in 2011 also has received extensive media coverage in The Times, and the New York Law Journal, including when the action was settled, in 2014, for $10 million in federal court and an additional $3 million in the New York State Court of Claims.

In 2011, the news media reported Mr. Rudin's success in convincing the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to dismiss the double homicide indictment of the firm's client, Danny Colon, based upon Mr. Rudin's reinvestigation of the case and uncovering of prosecutorial misconduct. Danny had been wrongfully convicted in 1993, but Mr. Rudin, after a six-year fight, had convinced the New York Court of Appeals, in 2009, to overturn the conviction for prosecutorial misconduct. The reversal was reported in The New York Times and the New York Daily News. Danny Colon's story was featured in the New York Daily News, which noted Mr. Rudin's "well-earned reputation for righting wrongful convictions." So was the eventual civil settlement that Mr. Rudin won, for Danny and his co-defendant, Anthony Ortiz, for a total of $9 million.

'Bronx Five' Day Care Sexual Abuse Exonerations And $5 Million Settlement

Mr. Rudin succeeded in winning freedom for Alberto Ramos, the Rev. Nathaniel T. Grady, Sr., Franklin Beauchamp and Jesus Torres — four of the five innocent men who were falsely convicted of child sexual abuse at Bronx day care centers during a witch hunt by the Bronx district attorney in the 1980s. The story was featured in the Los Angeles Times.

Mr. Rudin's freeing of Alberto Ramos, who served seven years because the Bronx District Attorney's Office suppressed exculpatory evidence proving his innocence, was prominently covered in The New York Times and all the news media. So was his recovery in 2003 of a $5 million civil rights settlement for Mr. Ramos — at the time the largest such award for a wrongfully convicted man in New York state history. Mr. Rudin appeared on " Democracy Now!" to discuss the landmark settlement with his client, and the case was featured in Newsday.

Rev. Nathaniel T. Grady's 10-year plight, Mr. Rudin's success in winning his release, and then his success in overturning Rev. Grady's conviction and winning dismissal of all charges, all were prominently reported.

The Acquittal And Civil Rights Lawsuit Of New York City Detective Zaher Zahrey

Mr. Rudin won a favorable story in The New York Times focusing on federal prosecutors' highly questionable reliance on a single career criminal informant to indict Zaher Zahrey, the first Palestinian detective in the New York City Police Department. Det. Zahrey's acquittal was reported in The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times and elsewhere.

A feature length piece in New York Magazine then reported on Det. Zahrey's civil suit, handled by Mr. Rudin and the firm. Bob Herbert, the noted The New York Times op-ed columnist, wrote six stories on the case, praising Mr. Rudin's zealous advocacy and quoting his cross-examination of informant Sidney Quick. Mr. Rudin's groundbreaking victory in the United States Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit, upholding the lawsuit, received front-page coverage in the New York Law Journal, and the $2.25 settlement, covering damage and fees, was reported as well.

The Lawsuit And $3.5 Million Settlement For Shih-Wei Su

The New York Times reported Mr. Rudin's $3.5 million wrongful conviction settlement on behalf of firm client Shih-Wei Su. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Jim Dwyer wrote a full column about the misconduct that caused Mr. Su's ordeal, the court system's failure to discipline the prosecutor responsible and the success of Mr. Su's lawsuit.